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How can I help my child succeed?

Success looks different for every child.

Mother watching daughter paint

When your child is struggling at school or refusing to go to school, knowing you are on their side is what matters most. Every child has something to offer and deserves some success at school. Success looks different for every child and it’s not just about grades and test scores. Set realistic goals with your child and celebrate their little wins. All those little wins can make a big difference.

Find out how you can make a difference if your child is struggling at school and read more about how you can help your child find success.

Transcript

[Music]
Narrator: Okay, so you want to help your child succeed but where do you start?
There is no simple one-size-fits-all solution to achieving success, but there are a number of things that you and your child can do that will help get them on the right track. First up, we need to take a look at what success actually looks like. This will be different for everyone, but one thing’s for sure, it’s not all about grades and test scores. Success can mean so much more.
Parent 1: Success can be finishing an assignment before it’s due.
Parent 2: It can be making a good choice.
Parent 3: Learning from mistakes.
Parent 4: Putting time and energy into something,
Parent 2: having it fail,
Parent 1: but then giving it another go.
Parent 2: Success can be saying something good about their day, unprompted.
Parent 1: Being ready for school on time.
Parent 3: Helping a friend with schoolwork.
Parent 2: Learning something new.
Parent 4: Or maybe it’s using something they’ve learned at school in the real world.
Narrator: Success looks different for everyone that’s why it’s important to recognise the ‘little wins’. When you put them all together they make a big difference. So don’t put pressure on yourself or your child by setting goals that are too big and ambitious. By identifying realistic goals, you can get some runs on the board, which will build your confidence and your child’s confidence too.
Once your child experiences the thrill and endorphin hit of praise and achievement, it will motivate them to want more. Discover more on the Spark Their Future website.

Last Updated: 30 September 2020